Thursday, 10 August 2017

The Untold Story of ST Oredein, a Political Godfather Who Became a Robbery Kingpin


https://onigegewura.blogspot.com.ng/

There was no one in Western Nigeria who did not know S. T. Oredein. If there was such a person, he must have just arrived from Planet Jupiter. Chief Samuel Taiwo Oredein was not just a politician. He was politics personified. He was a kingmaker. He was a godfather. In fact, he was the Big Boss.

Oredein belonged to the exclusive club of the seven people who partnered with Chief Obafemi Awolowo to establish the Action Group which became the party that produced the first premier of the region. You don’t know the other founders? I will tell you. They are: Abiodun Akerele, Ade Akinsanya, J. O. Adigun, S. O. Shonibare, Ayo Akinsanya, and Olatunji Dosunmu.

Founders of the Action Group
ST did not hold a cabinet position. He was however more powerful than some Ministers of government. He was the Principal Organising Secretary of the Action Group in the First Republic. It is on record that ST had legal authority to issue query to Ministers and chairmen of government’s statutory corporations. It was Chief Oredein that broke the news of Segun's death to Chief Awolowo.

As an acclaimed authority on political moblisation, he also wrote a book. He was the author of A Manual on Action Group Party Organisation. It was published in 1955. 

When the news broke in 1971 of his involvement in a case of armed robbery, it was greeted with shock and unbelief. It must have been a mistake, people thought. Or could it have been a political frame-up?

Today, Onigegewura brings you the story of a political godfather who became a robbery kingpin.

On April 13, 1971, Nigerians woke up to hear the news of an armed robbery attack on Bacita Road. Bacita is a small town in Kwara State. It used to be a very popular town in the past. It is the location of Nigerian Sugar Company. When the company was established in 1964, it was the first integrated sugar factory in Nigeria.  The town even has an airstrip.

The armed robbery attack was as daring as it was audacious. It was carried out with military precision. Two officers of Barclays Bank and two policemen who were in the vehicles that were attacked by the armed robbers were seriously wounded. One of the wounded persons later died of his injuries at the hospital. (And in case you are wondering what happened to the then Barclays Bank, it is the bank that became our present day Union Bank of Nigeria Plc.)

At the end of the ‘operation’, the armed robbers went away with a box containing thirteen thousand pounds. That was a lot of money in 1971. Chief Awolowo was then the Finance Minister and with his prudent management of Nigerian economy, our pound was almost at par with the British pound.

Barclays Bank Building
Mr. Kam Salem was the Inspector General of Police at the time. The Kam Salem House on Moloney Street, Obalende, Lagos is named after him. He directed all police formations across the country to fish out those behind the attack. The police spread its dragnet and within days of the robbery, Felix Dumeh, the leader of the gang was arrested. Nigerians jubilated when they heard the news.

Felix did not make any attempt to deny being the ringleader. He promised to cooperate with the police. He told his interrogators that although he was the leader of the gang, he was not the real brain behind the daring raid. Felix must have at some point in his life aspired to be a musician. He began to sing like a canary. He started to mention names.

The investigators listened in shock as Felix began to mention one name after another. He was not mentioning names of common criminals that the police officers were familiar with. The names of people he mentioned as his backers, protectors and shareholders were names of people you only read about in newspapers.

The first person he mentioned was a Chief Superintendent of Police at the State Criminal Investigation Department in Ibadan, Patrick Njovens. The interrogators opened their mouth in wonder. Felix threw another bomb when he mentioned Mr. Yesufu Bello, an Assistant Superintendent of Police also of CID, Ibadan. The third person he listed as his backer was Amusa Abidogun, a Chief Inspector of Police stationed in Ibadan.

The investigators thought they had heard everything. They didn’t know that egun nla ni o n kehin igbale. It is the biggest masquerade that is the last to come out of the grove. Then Felix spoke again. The name came out in a whisper. It was the name they were all familiar with. I have already told you that there was no one in the Western Region that did not know High Chief Oredein.

Iya Agba, my grandmother, used to tell me that when a child’s net catches a tilapia, the child eats it alone. But when the net catches a shark, the child must run to his father. The investigators knew immediately that this was not a tilapia. The fish they were looking at was nothing but a shark. They went to brief their superior.

The Kwara State Commissioner of Police was Mr. Sunday Adewusi. He was later to serve as the Inspector General of Police between 1981 and 1983. Ha! You remember him? He was the IGP when Alhaji Shehu Shagari was the President.

Mr. Adewusi sent his officers to Ibadan Command to investigate the matter. On getting to Ibadan, Adewusi’s officers were arrested by the three senior police officers they were sent to arrest! You are saying “Haba!” The hunters became the hunted. The Ilorin officers were later thrown out of the station! They were warned never to come to Ibadan again.

The three senior officers however didn’t reckon with Adewusi’s tenacity. He came back and got the three of them arrested. He took them to Ilorin. He also invited Chief Oredein for a 'chat'.

Chief Oredein arrived at the Police Command in a grand style. He came to Ilorin in his Mercedes car with its unique plate number: WR 6666. He expected it to be a brief meeting. He had engagements later that day in Ibadan and he had promised to be back at his base before nightfall.

Unknown to ST, the police had done their homework thoroughly. They had painstakingly investigated the case and gathered relevant evidence and related materials before inviting the political godfather. One of the people that the police met in the course of their investigation was Mustapha Adigun who was popularly called Balewa. He got the nickname from the abbreviation of his first name, Tafa! But he was never a Prime Minister. He was also called Tafa Igiripa by some people. 

Adigun claimed that Oredein was his boss during the days of politics when he (Adigun) was the head of ST’s political boys. He informed the police that in the evening of the day of the armed robbery attack, he went with his boss to the house of Felix Dumeh. In addition to his boss, the three police officers mentioned by Felix were also present. I am not sure they were wearing police uniforms for that special assignment.

Felix was said to have brought out a bottle of schnapps and some pieces of alligator pepper. He opened the bottle  and poured a little quantity on the floor and also threw some alligator pepper on the floor. Like a Chief Priest, Felix then raised the bottle of the alcoholic drink and said: “this thing wey tin we dey do, God make it no let it prove.” They all chorused amen to the solemn prayers. Felix then drank out of the bottle and chewed one alligator pepper. The four of them also drank out of the bottle and chewed alligator pepper.

Oath taking and prayers completed, Felix went to bring a brown paper bag. It was the size of a carton. He gave it to Oredein. ST was about to open the carton when Amusa Abidogun, the Chief Inspector of Police snatched it from him. Abidogun passed the carton to his superior officer Njovens, with a smart police salute. You know seniority is important in the Force. It was the Chief Superintendent of Police who finally opened the paper bag. It was full of currency.

Njovens looked suspiciously at the carton, his eyes made a mental calculation of the total sum. “How much?” He asked. Felix raised his spread left palm before saying “Five.” The senior police officer shook his head. “Is that the arrangement? Before, the arrangement was seven” Felix began to fidget. “The boys are too many on it.” Well, half a loaf of bread was still bread. Five or Seven, Njovens was not one to reject money. Akosapo la n ko owo. The proper way to reject money is to put it in your pocket, as Iya Agba used to say.

Oredein was stunned when he arrived at the police headquarters to meet both Adigun and Felix. Commissioner Adewusi asked them to repeat what they told the police. They did. In the presence of Oredein, Felix confirmed Adigun’s statement that it was Oredein that first received the carton of money from him before Abidogun snatched it from him.

The former Principal Organising Secretary of the Action Group looked blankly at Felix. With a straight face and a deadpan expression, he denied knowing Felix or ever visiting his house. Njovens, Bello and Abidogun also made feeble attempts to deny knowing Felix. Later they started to beg the future IGP to assist them because it was the devil that actually used them to collect the money. “Ise asetani ni. Mo fi Anabi ati Jesu Krisiti beyin!” That was from Alhaji Amusa Abidogun, the Chief Inspector. He offered to return part of his own share.

Sample of Nigerian One Pound Note. It was introduced in 1968
Chief Oredein, the master strategist, realized that the cards were stacked against him. He checked his sleeve to see whether he had an ace he could use. He found none. It was then he reluctantly admitted that all that Adigun who was also known as Tafa Igiripa said was correct. However, the Chief denied that the money was in one-pound denomination as stated by Adigun. Adigun maintained his stand. Finally, ST nodded his head that the money was actually in one-pound denomination.
Reverse Side of Nigerian One Pound Note. It was withdrawn in 1973


It was over the radio that people heard the news. Chief Oredein had been arrested and would be arraigned in Court for armed robbery! Armed robbery! It must have been a case of mistaken identity. It could not have been the Chief S. T. Oredein that they knew. Armed robbery! Ki lo pa alaso funfun ati alaro po? What could have been the connection with the owner of a white cloth and a dyer? 

In truth, Chief Oredein was not a poor man by any standard. Everybody knew he was a man of means.  Ohun ti a ko mo ni a ko mo, eni ti o ba ti ri oyun oyinbo ti mo pe omo pupa ni o ma fi bi. It is a well-known fact that the product of a white woman's pregnancy would always be fair in complexion. Between 1942 and 1962, Chief Oredein had erected six buildings. And mind you, we are not talking of four-bedroom ‘boys quarters’ in a village o! We are talking of real buildings in strategic locations. Four of the houses were at Ibadan. He built one at Oshodi. The sixth building was in a prime area in Ikeja.

What of automobiles? ST had a total of nine vehicles, including cars and lorries for both his business and personal use. He was not only sagacious on the political field. He was also productive in the other room. He was blessed with more than 30 children.

Finally the day of the trial arrived. People had travelled all the way from Lagos, Ibadan and Ogere to Ilorin to confirm whether it was truly the Chief Oredein that was arrested. To the surprise of many of his supporters and friends, it was the author of the book on political organisation himself that was brought to court.

ST was arraigned alongside the three senior police officers. They were charged with abetting the commission of a robbery and of receiving stolen property as well as offence of harbouring known offenders. In other words, they were charged with receiving 5,000 pounds from the armed robbers in order to screen them from legal punishment for the offence.

It was a criminal trial like no other. It was a battle of giants. Chief Oredein and Patrick Njovens briefed Chief Rotimi Williams to appear for them. Bello and Abidogun retained the services of Mr. Richard Akinjide. The prosecution was led by the Director of Public Prosecutions for Kwara State, Mr. Anthony Ekundayo. The three senior lawyers proved their mettle.  

The trial judge was a relatively young judge, having been appointed to the Bench only two years before the trial. However, what My Lord Justice Moradeyo Adesiyun lacked in age, His Lordship made up with uncommon brilliance and exemplary courage.

At the trial, Chief Oredein testified that on the day of the robbery he was at his hometown, Ogere having left Ibadan around 6.30pm on that day and only came back to Ibadan the following day. He admitted that it was true that Adewusi confronted him on May 26 with Felix Dumeh but he stated that he denied there and then the allegations of Dumeh. His principal witness was his solicitor who claimed that he was with Chief on April 13 from about 3pm to 11pm. Chief also called an Imam and a farmer as his witnesses. They all testified that he was at Ogere on the evening of April 13.

The trial was not only being conducted in the courtroom. From Ilorin to Ibadan, From Lagos to Enugu, From Port Harcourt to Ile-Ife, people were also busy conducting their own versions of the trial. Would the young judge be able to convict ST if he was found guilty? Would AG leaders allow their former colleague to go to prison for robbery?

When His Lordship adjourned the matter to December 28, 1971 for judgment, speculations began afresh. It was said that it was to enable the judge to release the accused before the end of the year. Some said that thanksgiving services had been planned to coincide with the New Year. All Nigerians waited with bated breath for the judgment day.

Finally, the day arrived. It was a Tuesday. It was three days after Christmas and three days before the New Year.

The four accused persons were brought to the Court in a Black Maria. If ST felt any apprehension, it was not apparent. As he was led to the court, Oredein gave the sign of victory to the crowd of spectators who had come from far and near to hear the verdict. It was a good sign. It was a sign of victory. His people became happy.

Hon. Justice Moradeyo Adesiyun began by reviewing the charges against the four of them. His Lordship extensively analysed and appraised the evidence. When His Lordship noted the fact that the accused were not at the scene of the crime, Oredein turned to smile at the people in the courtroom. He would soon be on his way home.

Then came the moment. His Lordship found that though the accused persons were not physically present at the scene of the armed robbery, they had prior knowledge of the robbery before it took place and that the three of them who were police officers did nothing to prevent the robbery. His Lordship also found that they all received proceeds of the robbery.

Justice Adesiyun therefore came to the conclusion that the accused persons were guilty of the charges against them.

Chief Oredein could not believe his ears. Guilty as charged? He was not going to be free? His native cap which he had been holding, in deference to the authority of the court, clattered to the floor with a thud. The High Chief from Ogere Remo stood still as if he was Opa Oranmiyan in Ile-Ife. It was Yesufu Bello who was standing beside him that nudged him back to reality. “Chief, 'they' are asking if you have anything to say.”

Oredein had not prepared any allocutus. He had not expected to be convicted. Ko si eni ti o gbe oju fifo le adiye ori aba. Who could have imagined that a mother hen would fly off from her hatchery? You don't know allocutus? It is another Latin word they taught us in Law School. It is a statement made by a defendant who has been found guilty before he is sentenced. It is like 'A beg, tamper justice with mercy' that a Lagos bus driver would tell you after breaking the side mirror of your Range Rover.

Allocutus or no allocutus, something must be said. The court had only convicted, His Lordship had not yet pronounced their sentences. Perhaps something could still be done. His eyes scanned the crowded courtroom. It appeared he was looking for someone or something. Whatever he was looking for was not in the court. He turned back to His Lordship.

Oredein pleaded for leniency. In a very moving voice, he informed the court of his past travails: “First it was the treasonable felony and conspiracy trial, but I was acquitted at the Supreme Court. Second, the Aberenla murder trial came, and I was in custody for 11 months before I was freed at Ijebu-Ode High Court. I humbly plead for Your Lordship’s forgiveness.”

Of course you know the treasonable felony trial the Chief referred to. The Aberenla trial he mentioned was the case over the murder of Ogunkoya Aberenla who was the Leader of Ogere Remo's branch of Nigerian National Democratic Party of Chief Ladoke Akintola (Not to be confused with the party of the same name established by Herbert Macaulay in 1922). Aberenla's body was never found. Onigegewura will write about his mysterious disappearance soon. 

Justice Adesiyun looked at the accused persons. “If you had any conscience, you should drop your heads in shame.” His Lordship observed that they were lucky not to have been caught by the amendment to the Robbery and Firearms Decree which provided death by public execution for convicted armed robbers and those found to have aided and abetted armed robbery.

His Lordship therefore sentenced each of them to life imprisonment. There was no Federal Court of Appeal in those days. It was only Western State that had a Court of Appeal and Kwara was not part of Western State.

The four of them ran all the way to the Supreme Court.

On May 3, 1973, the Supreme Court delivered its judgment. My Lord Justice Coker who delivered the judgment of the apex court dismissed the appeal of all the convicted persons and affirmed the life sentences imposed on them by the trial court.

Chief Rotimi Williams later became a Senior Advocate of Nigeria. Mr. Richard Akinjide became a Chief, a Senior Advocate of Nigeria, and Attorney General of the Federation. Mr. Anthony Ekundayo, the DPP, was elevated to the Bench as a Justice of the High Court of Kwara State. The trial Judge, My Lord Adesiyun was also elevated. His Lordship served as the Chief Judge of Benue State from 1976 until his retirement in 1985.

History Does Not Forget! Historian is not a judge, History is.

I thank you most warmly for your time. Please don't forget to leave your comment below. Winners of our first set of books will be announced next week.

Olanrewaju Onigegewura©


The right of Olanrewaju Onigegewura© to be identified as the author of stories published on this blog has been asserted by him in accordance with the copyright laws. I encourage my beloved readers to always identify Olanrewaju Onigegewura© the Amateur Historian, as the author of these stories when they ‘Forward As Received’.


230 comments:

  1. Another interesting read from ONIGEGEWURA. I noticed that nobody interfered with the course of justice & the courts gave their Judgements on time,which is a far cry from today. Nigerians need not look afar for men & women of integrity,we have them in our very sokoto. Let's celebrate them

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's justice at its best not the one of Nigeria today, money justice. May God expose everyone perverting the course of justice in this country

      Delete
    2. What we see today is clearly different from what in folk in those days. Today, if you have money, you can easily secure justice and go Scot free no matter henious crime you commit. Nothing like decorum again in Nigeria

      Delete
  2. Wonderful, integrity used to be pride of men. Onigewura I love your narrative humorous but educative story.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Exactly. Narrative humorous lovely.

      Delete
  3. Another blockbuster as promised!

    ReplyDelete
  4. When historian wrote,it is always a spellbound. Onigegeara has brought back a template for all old and young, the small and big who in one way or the other had lost link with history.Who still remmeber conections of Baclays with Union bank? Sunday Adewusi with I. G post? Keep it up our modern link

    ReplyDelete
  5. Pleasantly interesting... May your ink of knowledge and wisdom never go dry

    ReplyDelete
  6. Well done sir, the story reminds us of when justice was not compromised,when justice was served without fear or favour.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There was no great or favour in this. If you care to know it was a political propergander. My father was never an armed robber nor a robbery kingpin get that straight Arinola. Bloggers are free to what they can write but the truth stand. We the children of ST OREDEIN are proud to be his and nothing can change that. PROUDLY OREDEIN SAY WHATEVER

      Delete
  7. You are doing a great work. Learning about our past history gives us insight to our rich background. Well done, onigegewura

    ReplyDelete
  8. I heard about 'ST' as he was popularly called but I did not know he was a robbery king pin. Thanks Onigegewura for the walk on history lane. Hummmm so we had a 1 Nigeria pound equal to 1 British pound at sometime in our history?. If it has happened before in Nigeria, it certainly can repeat itself...hopefully.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Point of correction, my father Chief S T Oredein was never an armed robber nor a robbery kingpin do pls get your information straight and right. Posterity will judge someday. Proudly Oredein.

      Delete
    2. If your assertion is correct, I think you should state the other side for posterity because this write up is actually news to me, I have heard of the name ST Oredein but not as a criminal.

      Delete
    3. A straight and consist statement had already been provided by one of my sisters Kemi Oredein so mine will just be a repetition. If you follow the blog very well I believe you could have seen our response. Proudly Oredein.

      Delete
    4. Remember this happened before corruption became Nigeria's National Flag! So keep your pride to yourself, you should be ashamed of what your dad did.
      Bi a se yo so naa la n'yo gbo!

      Delete
    5. Don't worry yourself defending that, d way you are on this picture shows ur are very successful woman, that is not yastic to measure you of ur present family that is in d past, He was ur father is his choice learn from it and move on.

      Delete
    6. Re anonymous the only prayer I have for you and your entire family is so simple *iru e a sele ni idile yin, ejo aimodi ko ni kuro ni idile yin, orisa Ibeji a fi Iya he enu ati owo to fi ko iru eleyi. I owe you no further explanation as I can see you are stucked with your opinion about the issue but in the meantime I dashed you the above to deal with.

      Delete
  9. Succinctly and creatively delivered as usual. Though a long read, but the comical touch on the writeup makes it an interesting one. Thanks.
    Ah ! the allocutus ! I dont think I would want to forget easily. I was about to check the dictionary when I got the meaning from the next paragraph.Thats creativity.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Succinctly and creatively delivered as usual. Though a long read, but the comical touch on the writeup makes it an interesting one. Thanks.
    Ah ! the allocutus ! I dont think I would want to forget easily. I was about to check the dictionary when I got the meaning from the next paragraph.Thats creativity.

    ReplyDelete
  11. A soothing narrative of the ageing prevalence in the socio-political polity. The underworld finds their fingers burnt by their own ways.a brilliant historical narrative.Akinyemi Bolarinwa

    ReplyDelete
  12. Nobody ever told us the part of ST Oredein story all that we were ever told or known about ST were his AG exploits and trial for treasonable felony. Thanks Onigegewura May his tribe increare in our nation to promote national understanding and development.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Nobody ever told us the part of ST Oredein story all that we were ever told or known about ST were his AG exploits and trial for treasonable felony. Thanks Onigegewura May his tribe increare in our nation to promote national understanding and development.

    ReplyDelete
  14. A lot of history I didn't learn I school, Onigegewura is doing an amazing job of schooling me. Great piece.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Thanks for this piece. As usual, you really gave me an insight into what use to be a complete society where rank and status don't matter but justice. How I wish we could go back to the good old days.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Thanks for this piece. As usual, you really gave me an insight into what use to be a complete society where rank and status don't matter but justice. How I wish we could go back to the good old days.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Never actually saw the Nigerian Pound until I read this piece.
    Oh, that my country could go back to such times when the high and the mighty were tried and given deserving judgments!
    This was as informative as it was entertaining; don't stop.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Nice write up. Indeed a fall from grace.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Nice write up. Indeed a fall from grace.

    ReplyDelete
  20. It means Nobody above the law, if the judge is not corrupted,they were found wanting and sentenced accordingly, kudos to the then Judge ,and more grace to your elbow Onigegewura for this interesting and wonderful history

    ReplyDelete
  21. Hmmm. An interesting and enlightening read as usual. History never forgets.

    ReplyDelete
  22. Bravo Onigegewura, as usual am always amazed reading your masters piece. More grease to your elbow sir.

    ReplyDelete
  23. Akinsola Miftahu Kunle11 August 2017 at 01:20

    This is a wonderful history, no manipulation, permutation or influence from any quarter, they were found guilty and sentenced by a courageous Judge, kudos to Onigegewura

    ReplyDelete
  24. Very educative, your humour makes the reading smooth. How I wish our current leaders and young generations will learn from this, we should see and treat crimes, criminals as they are without political affiliations, ethnic or religious beliefs that we term witch-hunt.

    ReplyDelete
  25. More of these true life stories

    ReplyDelete
  26. I think am stuck with you onigegewura when it comes to Nigeria's history. Your brilliant use of words and the rhythm of your narrative is indeed awesome, captivating and very engaging, it is a case of no dull moment. PLS could you the story of the Kano riot? And the true story of the Aburi Accord and it's aftermath. Kudos to you sir. And I recommend that the readers of this blog should encourage their children to read this blog to. That way they'll know who we were.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. True, we should be told about the Aburi Accord, the Kano riots and those related facts about the civil war in the words of Onigegewura

      Delete
    2. True, we should be told about the Aburi Accord, the Kano riots and those related facts about the civil war in the words of Onigegewura

      Delete
  27. I found this piece insightful ,enlightening and educative with a nice dash of humour.Thank you onigegewura for taking us down history lane once again!-Wunmi

    ReplyDelete
  28. I found this piece insightful ,enlightening and educative with a nice dash of humour.Thank you onigegewura for taking us down history lane once again!-Wunmi

    ReplyDelete
  29. A truly wonderful read I must say. Felt like I was watching a mainframe production. The writer needs to collaborate with uncle Tunde Kelani, STAT. Two thumbs up!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's been my thought from day one! A screen writer will do a great job with Monsieur Olanrewaju!

      Delete
  30. Awesome read. Keep letting the ink flow freely...

    ReplyDelete
  31. Lucid, racy and with a touch of life! You have done it again. I have only read about Oredehin the politician not the armed robber. Thank you for this history coming alive again. We must support this venture, we will call attention of everybody to this blog.

    ReplyDelete
  32. Excellent piece. How I wish Nigeria could find her integrity one again where position, fame, tribe, wealth, and political affiliation among others bow before truth and justice.

    ReplyDelete
  33. God bless you as you continue to bring the past to the present. More power to your elbow

    ReplyDelete
  34. Nice write up. It suggests that it is just a matter of time for whatever we do secretly to be exposed.

    It is a lesson for all of us to always do good both in our external and internal relationship with people.

    The law of karma is always alive to punish the evil doers no matter how smart they think they are.

    ReplyDelete
  35. Well written narration of great historical event. Even though Chief Awolowo was vice president of Nigeria at that time he did not rescue his boy tuned Armed Robber beyond securing the services of the best lawyer in town. Great,;!

    ReplyDelete
  36. Well done, I do recall that the case of Njovens v State is still a landmark SC decision and you have done well to refresh our memory with the background to this case.

    ReplyDelete
  37. Always very proud of you

    ReplyDelete
  38. Very very interesting and educative

    ReplyDelete
  39. Very educative,precise with accurate precision,remain blessed.Eunice

    ReplyDelete
  40. How I wish Cheif SLA was still alive as at that time! What an embarrassment it must have been for Cheif Awolowo!!!

    No wonder the study if history is never encouraged in Nigeria, some sleeping dogs are better left untouched.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Truly that could have been the reason behind the cancellation of history indeed
      In fact, unadulterated history is the best teacher

      Delete
  41. Please I'm looking for a job, I studied computer science with in depth knowledge in Web and Web app development, my email is :dammy1.4kol@gmail.com, God bless you as you help a soul today

    ReplyDelete
  42. Thanks for reminding us of the events. You brought it alive again with your humour. But was it not for cover up that Patrick Njovens and the other Ibadan Police officers were sentenced? You made it look like they were part of the gang ab initio. All the same , thanks for the memories.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nigerian politicians of today are committing more gravious offence and more deadlier than armed robbery going by the number of people who lost their lives on daily basis due to the diversion of money meant for provision of facilities that is meant to save lives and prevent preventable deaths and ailments. Politicians are the most crooked people especially in Nigeria.

      Delete
  43. Very interesting read! Patrick Njovens: the name jumped at me, from my Crim. Law class at A.B.U., Zaria.

    ReplyDelete
  44. Good one from near past history. Nothing new under the sun.....

    ReplyDelete
  45. A well researched work, good for our library God continue to bless and enrich you.Abolarinwa

    ReplyDelete
  46. Many thanks for reliving a glorious past and path at nationhood. Where is the sugar factory in Kwara today and other like initiatives that made Nigeria's very strong at the time?

    The evils of military intervention.

    Bolarinwa Osiyale
    bosiyale@fischerblair.com

    ReplyDelete
  47. Hmmm...amazing stuff, I am truly intrigued... Can we have more of such stories, not necessarily of criminals but also of men and women of integrity. Let our younger generation read and learn the virtues of hard work, honesty and the fear of God which are fast becoming outdated. Thank you for this story, which by the way is my first. I would like to read about the civil war, acts of bravery by soldiers, narratives of several coup d'etats, stories of the infamous "blockers" robbery gang, Oyenusi's gang, exploits of great musicians and the like. Finally how does one get to know when you have something new out.

    ReplyDelete
  48. There is nothing amateurish about your writings. You are a professional historian.
    I have been following since Barrister Ibrahim Lawal started sharing on his wall.
    Keep up the good work Sir

    Olusegun Ogunleye

    ReplyDelete
  49. reading your historical perspectives is intriguing, given that i dropped out of OSU's Law Dpt for journalism. reading you reminisces the past unforeseen.

    ReplyDelete
  50. Nice piece. Enjoy the memory down the history lane. Well done. More grease.

    ReplyDelete
  51. Wow! Why did ST decide to soil name like that? I guess the answer is blowing in the wind. Another brilliant piece sir! 👍👍👍

    ReplyDelete
  52. This shows how decadent our judiciary has become over the years, the question is how many of these eminent people are still on the bench. Majority of today's judges are interested in money than pursuit of justice.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Very interesting but if it was now a day political leaders or school / class mate of the judge will have moved in and course of justice perverted. A lot of injustice today due to interference by obas,high chief both political spiritual, traditional, retired Judges of all dimension all these are the bane barring our progress. Only incorruptible leaders can save us,

      Delete
  53. An eye opener...

    ReplyDelete
  54. Very captivating story indeed!

    ReplyDelete
  55. Slowly getting hooked to this blog.

    I keep learning with each blog post.

    ReplyDelete
  56. Reading through this piece, my mind went back to the unfortunate event, the investigation, the trial and all that. I stand to be corrected, the Chief Investigator was Aremu Adifa or so. The morale of this case was that Oredein and the three police officers were a disappointment as they betrayed the honour given to them by the society. Onigegewura, I salute your dexterity and sense of history. Bravo.

    ReplyDelete
  57. Bagbimo! I am more than humbled, Sir. You are our source of inspiration, Sir. This is my modest attempt to follow in your illustrious footsteps, sir.

    ReplyDelete
  58. Very interesting history. It reminds me of the good old days when Nigeria was still upright, unlike now when a case of corruption will last till..talk less of arm robbery. Excellent job.

    ReplyDelete
  59. learning life through history, courtesy Onigegewura.

    ReplyDelete
  60. Hmm, superb as always keep it up sir.

    ReplyDelete
  61. Thanks for reminding us and giving the full gist of what we heard growing up.

    It wasn't only Oredein or Ejigbadero that were criminals in those days. Yoruba says 'isale oro ni egbin'. Evil may actually be at the root of how people became wealthy.

    Because many of those who also walked the ways of Oredein and Ejigbadero got away with it we didn't know that many of those men of money and power actually went into crime to build their foundation or consolidate their position in the society.

    The 1970s were a lot of revelations!

    ReplyDelete
  62. Very nice one sir, I can only pray to God to continue strengthening you.

    Like this piece and the other one of land landlord in Lagos that had encounter with people of alimosho, one would clearly see that everybody that has been involving in the case to trial to judgement (the accused, the witnesses, the prosecutor, the defendants, the complainants, the government and so on) were all up and doing and all allowed the course of justice to prevail unhindered /unabated .the irony is what we see and witnessing in the country today. Judgement is for the rich, the well known, the government and their cronies and the likes.

    But sir, I have a question about this particular piece.... Those people that were sentence to life imprisonment, did they served their time and died in the prison or what later became of them? Hope not that they were later fred by superior powers?

    Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  63. Kudos to onigegewura.This is a fantastic blog which I am now addicted to.i check several times a day for new stories.please keep it coming.this can actually be compiled into a book of volumes with different titles as deemed fit and saved permanently for posterity. Checking back at 11 pm for updates��
    I am really curious though about what became of the parties involved. Please do a follow up. We are waiting.

    ReplyDelete
  64. My goodness, Onigegewura has won my heart! Though I was once a History teacher, but as Fela would say "Teacher pass Teacher"-Onigegewura, I doff my hat. Your style makes reading novel and interesting. This is a special gift and an "unsurpassable" talent. May your ink never run dry. O seun o!

    ReplyDelete
  65. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  66. How did Baba Awolowo reacted to this. it was a stain on AG as a party and also stain on Baba Awolowo person

    ReplyDelete
  67. Excellent! Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  68. One did read the piece on Chief S. T. Oredein with keen interest as a basis for comparative analysis of the past with the present. The difference is clear! The operators of the present Judicial Systems at all levels should bury their pride and learn from our past. I wish to register my profound appreciation to the writer of the story. God bless you abundantly.
    Chief Ebenezer Abiola Akinbolade

    ReplyDelete
  69. Onigegewura, you such an eloquent writer. You brought history back to live. I could almost see the faces of the trio due to your narratives. Pls bring us more history like these that cannot be taught in schools.

    ReplyDelete
  70. Very interesting write up. Well written and quite illuminating. Keep it coming. Thanks

    ReplyDelete
  71. Very refreshing, particularly the event occurred while I was just 5yrs old.

    ReplyDelete
  72. Thanks for reminding me. I went to the same primary school with most of his children. Ebenezer okeado Ibadan

    ReplyDelete
  73. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  74. My dear Onigegewura, you are fast becoming an icon in our search for direction as a nation with your capacity to help trace our source. I dare say you even give us hope of uniting us considering the arresting effect of your delivery regardless of the reader's tribe or religion. Please don't ever stop. In fact get a good film director/producer/cinematographer in the mould of Tade Ogidan, Kunle Afolayan, Tunde Kelani, etc to make epics. They will not only boom economically but indeed provide a major tool for our NOA(Nat.Orientation Agency/Fed Min of Info). They should partner with you as a PPP. Once again, may your ink never run dry.-Dr.Leke Pitan

    ReplyDelete
  75. It is a very interesting story. A beautiful way of linking the old memory to new school. God ll increase your knowledge

    ReplyDelete
  76. Onigegewura. Thank you so much for this diverting story. The lucidity and all makes the prose unputdownable really. Did you also write the story of Oba Adeniran of Efon-Alaye who, alongside his accomplices, were hung for kidnapping a 3-year old in his domain named Adediwura? I really enjoyed these stories and look forward to the next. I also suspect there are marketing potential around your intellectual activities on your blog that you would do Well to exploit. Well done sir.

    ReplyDelete
  77. The Judge is Proudly an Offa man, Great fellow

    ReplyDelete
  78. The Judge is Proudly an Offa man, Great fellow

    ReplyDelete
  79. Onigegewura. Thank you so much for this diverting story. The lucidity and all makes the prose unputdownable really. Did you also write the story of Oba Adeniran of Efon-Alaye who, alongside his accomplices, were hung for kidnapping a 3-year old in his domain named Adediwura? I really enjoyed these stories and look forward to the next. I also suspect there are marketing potential around your intellectual activities on your blog that you would do Well to exploit. Well done sir.

    ReplyDelete
  80. Well done, Sir. If the powers that be deny hungry minds from being fed from the fount of history you give hope to the needy. People who know not from whence they came have little of being well grounded. Is there a subscription link?

    ReplyDelete
  81. I dont blame you Mr Writer. You merely rewrote govt position as was written and sold to journalists then. One day you will be educated and realise that when a state wants you,they get you.
    The cabal who plotted the evil against the man knew it was for self enhancement and knowledgeable people too knew the truth. One day,very soon when you face such trouble,which is inevitable anyway .. you will know that not all prisoners are criminals. OREDEIN was never a criminal.Time will tell.!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes the Oredeins will surely have their own version of the story, perhaps the personal and human angle to the story. However no one has yet put holes in the presentation of onigegewura. That presentation was a rendition of the real story that occurred in public. The events were chronicled and they can be confirmed by any one interested in the case. The names mentioned were not fake, the incidents including the court cases were real. From my perspective, history was not rewritten but presented. Others can now present the "behind the scenes" narration to shed more light on the actual events

      Delete
    2. Yes the Oredeins will surely have their own version of the story, perhaps the personal and human angle to the story. However no one has yet put holes in the presentation of onigegewura. That presentation was a rendition of the real story that occurred in public. The events were chronicled and they can be confirmed by any one interested in the case. The names mentioned were not fake, the incidents including the court cases were real. From my perspective, history was not rewritten but presented. Others can now present the "behind the scenes" narration to shed more light on the actual events

      Delete
  82. I dont blame you Mr Writer. You merely rewrote govt position as was written and sold to journalists then. One day you will be educated and realise that when a state wants you,they get you.
    The cabal who plotted the evil against the man knew it was for self enhancement and knowledgeable people too knew the truth. One day,very soon when you face such trouble,which is inevitable anyway .. you will know that not all prisoners are criminals. OREDEIN was never a criminal.Time will tell.!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well said there and very on point. Time will surely tell!

      Delete
  83. Someone sent me this. Thanks dear Dare. I've read it thoroughly and All I can say this.. "One day, Taiwo's story would be rewritten. A man was jailed for Life, yet his business flourished and while in prison educated 36 children and even died a rich man leaving vast Estate. How many Nigerian politicians encountered such problems and still died rich? Well, there's much people don't understand and would never understand. There was never a time my father begged for leniency. He told that court back then that if he had a hand in the robbery, he would die in prison and if not, he would return and HE DID RETURN. Cont'd

    ReplyDelete
  84. He went into politics a wealthy man and of course he was a very intelligent and brilliant man nobody could beat. A political strategist that is yet to be equalled in Nigeria.
    In his words "I thought it was a big joke. While in detention, the opposition party promised me freedom of I denounced Awolowo and I told them over my dead body. I had a bargain with them which of course they suspected I would not keep to cos they knew I was principled. I was shocked when I was jailed but I knew it was not over"
    A cabal wanted him out of the way at all cost. That's a story for another day.
    Once I watched a TV programme where one Olaifa a veteran journalist was interviewed and he was asked if he ever encountered any ordeal in the course of discharging his duty and his answer was "During Oredein's Robbery case, I was a young journalist and I was very keen on getting to the root of the case. I was privileged to know that the prosecuting attorney was visiting Oredein and I wondered why. Of course when I was found out, the authority was after me and I had to go into hiding for a while. Of course we, all knew what happened to Oredein".
    I do not have anything against the writer, he only rewrote the history he has access to but the people who jailed my father knew he was innocent and GOD vindicated him.
    One thing people don’t know however is that the sugar company that was robbed belonged to him. He was a major share holder and Partner. More than 40 Tate and Lyle Bicycles were parked in my compound when I was a child and we had the riders deliver proceeds of the day's sales. How would a man Rob himself? Laughable isn't it?
    My father was an accomplished business man and he abhorred crime. Cont'd

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I salute your ability to demonstrate being an Omoluabi who won't use her left hand to point the way to her father's house. However, your position that because ST owned the business he wouldn't rob himself is shaky. Since the idea of insuring assets was born, people have clued into committing fraud - burning their homes, robbing huge amounts of cash and other such immoral deeds. They lay claims and recover the "losses". I'm not saying that this is what happened in ST's case, just putting it to you that it is a weak argument. Akoba, adaba, ki Olorun ma je k'ari

      Delete
    2. Pls is it sugar coy or the barklay bank? That was robbed

      Delete
  85. He built most of the buildings in The University of Ife with his foreign partner, Gougard, A German. These are facts that can be cross checked .
    He was stupendously rich, he was well read, and he was powerful and was a power broker. He single handedly registered AG and others refunded his money later.
    Samuel Taiwo Oredein was getting too powerful for them. His words were fire and when he moved, people moved. (According to Odemo of Isara)
    If only he had betrayed Awolowo, may be his story would be different.
    Out of all the founders of Action Group, Only Oredein has a surviving "First child ". A, son, who is going to be 80 yrs old next year, He refused to swear to an oath of allegiance and he never joined any cult. He was a high chief of Ogere Land and the costume he wore back then "saki" was just honorary.
    He was a Christian to the core and his success was beyond them all. He was a man after God's heart and he came out of it all stronger.
    He was in prison for 10 yrs and he was still being wooed and was funding politics from there. Were people robbing for him while in prison?
    May GOD open our eyes of understanding.
    Once, Pa Jakande, said "Oredein was too open minded,...that was what ruined him.
    Baba Alayande had this to say "Your father had the Midas touch; he was a mirror they wanted to break at all cost. Pa Alayande was a clergy. He stood with my father throughout his ordeal and had lunch with him every Sunday after his release till he died.
    Taiwo was just a big threat. He was too big a bone for their dogs.
    One day, some day, his Story would be rewritten.
    A man who refused to swear with the life of his son, would swear with common robbers?
    The robbers even denied knowing him but of course when the state wants you the state gets you.
    I am very proud of my father and He remains my Hero.
    He looked at me once and said "Never ever go into politics and don't ever be In the company of politicians!
    While he was in prison, we went to the best of schools and had the best of life.
    He may be their kingpin....
    He is my Hero.... my father... my everything. The man who sacrificed it all for his children.
    My prayer however is that anyone who judges my father would by GOD'S GRACE find himself in his shoes. They will be wrongly accused and feel the taste of his swear.
    His accusers apologised and even offered him political posts on his return from prison... They were scared. In their minds, they were like... jagunlabi tun ti de... Awonasiwere.
    The man declined all offers and still lived and died in affluence. He bore his cross gallantly. I will walk with my shoulder and head high up and be proud to be an OREDEIN. A man who was predefined but demonized!
    More ink to your pen, onigegewura!
    Proudly OREDEIN。

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. May I suggest that you endeavour to document or recast his story by wrtiing a proper book. Otherwise, all I see here is sentimental and nostalgic defence of a loving father, which is not in itself a bad thing. A proper book detailing what in your opinion happened is the way to go!

      Delete
    2. Iam interested in your story and investigation. I will encourage you to write your own version if you are sure of your facts. I will be glad to partner with you. 08034697670

      Delete
    3. Touching story. Good to know that he came out of prison. And it is not difficult to believe that he was set up, politics of those days, as is now, was one of do or die.
      Well done for standing by your dad, please go further by moving to change the narrative, let the truth be known.

      Delete
  86. Great read. Do keep it up and definitely expecting more. Regards.

    ReplyDelete
  87. Folorunsho Tahir Hamsat11 August 2017 at 18:45

    If only Olanrewaju Onigegewura could reach out for further verification of this matter beyond bias, and also publish Kemi Oredein's rejoinder for a balanced understanding of the issue.

    ReplyDelete
  88. GOD bless you.
    I am Oredein and I am proud to be one. We know the truth and we have our rest.These vultures that demonized him came back to patronize him. If you all know the people you idolize like we do,you would be scandalized.
    Joy to the wise. Thanks for sharing this my dearest Bim. One day like Kemi said .. His story woukd be rewritten. I am proudly OREDEIN and my memory of my dad lives on. HE was a gift a Nation did not appreciate. Blind people don't appreciate good things cos they can hardly see. OREDEIN Baba ni Baba n je lojokojo.
    Nigerians should conduct private research. Some of his subordinates are still alive .
    I remember Adewusi apologized to my dad and one of my brothers said he should go public cos of us and our future. My Dad said it wouldn't be necessary . The judge said his hands were tied. We all know How Coker ended.
    Samuel Taiwo was an institution. He was a real man. For the ten years he spent in prison,he never grew a single grey on his head. He was all over d world like any Nigerian.
    The facts are there.... He spent most of his time outside the supposed "Prison". Went abroad on medical check up and stayed mostly in a big Lagos Hotel where we visited him.
    One thing that still endear him to me however is the fact that he never came home till he was released.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. He was jailed but while in prison travelled all over the world? And stayed in big hotels? Wow! So this nonsense didn't start today. SMH

      Delete
  89. Enjoyed every bit of the history. Thumbs up

    ReplyDelete
  90. Nice write up. Olufemi Peter

    ReplyDelete
  91. Onigegewura,thanks for the piece. We have bad eggs in the society long a go." Isale pro legbin" the root ofvwealth stinks.
    Fatunbi o.John

    ReplyDelete
  92. Onigegewura has done his part. Let those with different other side publish there's.

    ReplyDelete
  93. Let those with different opinion on the subject matter put there's on this page.

    ReplyDelete
  94. I was beginning to think that I may not know what happened at those times when I was a kid and my dad and friends will father and speak in gush tones, but now I think otherwise.

    This is the second story of onigegeara that am reading, I must confess both were fascinating. Must make time to read more and be enlightened about great and true legal battles.

    Thank yoy

    ReplyDelete
  95. May your pen never run dry
    I really enjoyed all the pieces read from your blog.

    ReplyDelete
  96. I've read quite a bit of onigegewura and I enjoy his writings, but this was poorly written..and not properly researched. Too hasty and the narrative too basic for a subject so sensitive. This great man was sacrificed by politicians and set up for a great fall for nothing he knew nothing about. Politicians all have hangers on and thugs who live and feed in their houses. Unfortunately during periods of no election this thugs become robbers. One of oredeins many houses was converted to a venue for sharing loot. How was he to know what was going on in his boysquarter? Prosperity has been kind to this man he had children who all did very well..I know 2 who are medical doctors. Everyone knew it was a political set up. I would have expected the writer to mention his role in the Action Group that led to his been hunted down. I'm quite disappointed in this piece.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What I read here is not suggestive of a setup in the least.
      In his allocutus, he did not plead his innocence and according to this writeup, he had admitted that it was the work of the Devil. I don't see how he was framed up here. If you have any other narrative, it would be fine to read it but this writeup sounds credible enough to me.

      Delete
    2. No were in the write up did it say Oredein admitted and say it was the work of the devil. He appealed to the supreme court.

      Nevertheless i dont believe the man was an armed robber. He simply didn't need to be. He was far too sophisticated, this man wrote a book on politics. He was a core member of the AG and had access to juicy contracts.

      Yes ,he courted the company of thugs who were the foot soldiers of the Crisis in the western region. Some were in this story lies lessons to be learnt particularly for todays politicians.

      Delete
  97. KEMI Oredeian, did you ever asked your father his role in the murder of Aberenla? Onigegeara is doing his job, mind you.What happened to the the other people that were convicted with your father?all framed up including the policemen? Bose baba elomi loku, won ake yee yee won a dake. That somebody have influence, money and finance different groups and projects doesn't mean he cant do otherwise. You ought to have appealed this before now. After all you claimed that you have everything at your disposal, money, best education, a man of the people and so on. History is not harsh but powerful. More Grease to your elbow. Onigegeara.

    ReplyDelete
  98. Fantastic write up with natural brilliance in the flow.

    ReplyDelete
  99. Ehn.. Great write -up.. As there are two sides of a coin, so is history.. We all live to become history. I'm fascinated by lessons from this write-up, keep it up @Onigegewura.

    ReplyDelete
  100. I want kemi to send d true side of d story for ppl to debunk or accept rather than doing side comment

    ReplyDelete
  101. A masterpiece from a man undoubtedly gifted with the power to thrill and delight via history. Even when we had history in school, it was mansa Musa and co they filled our young fertile minds with. Nothing on our rich chequered but own history. Thank you Onigegewura for these pieces that give us a rare glimpse at who we are. I am curious though. Did ST and his accomplices actually served out their lives in prison or did they make parole at some point or something?

    ReplyDelete
  102. Great piece. I like the writer's style. If people like Chief Oredein were present then. We have more of them these days in our society. Thanks

    ReplyDelete
  103. Didn't know oredein was jailed. I thought he was executed. I went to same primary school with most of his children. Ebenezer okeado Ibadan Nigeria

    ReplyDelete
  104. I'm very impressed by this write up. History is an important part of our lives that should be treasured, so that we can correct past mistakes. Unfortunately, Nigeria instead of learning is running away or even distorting history.
    Two classmates of mine were Oredein's children in secondary school then. They were initially withdrawn, but by the time they came back, SHAME could not let them settle down well. Even the most brilliant of them never made a good grade.
    But what do we have today? Children of treasury looters have the best and are celebrated. The armed robbers, kidnappers, ritualist,drug barons are the ones in position of authorities today.
    It's time for value reorientation, that will value hard work and discourage the get rich quick syndrome

    ReplyDelete
  105. I'm very impressed by this write up. History is an important part of our lives that should be treasured, so that we can correct past mistakes. Unfortunately, Nigeria instead of learning is running away or even distorting history.
    Two classmates of mine were Oredein's children in secondary school then. They were initially withdrawn, but by the time they came back, SHAME could not let them settle down well. Even the most brilliant of them never made a good grade.
    But what do we have today? Children of treasury looters have the best and are celebrated. The armed robbers, kidnappers, ritualist,drug barons are the ones in position of authorities today.
    It's time for value reorientation, that will value hard work and discourage the get rich quick syndrome

    ReplyDelete
  106. Of a truth, only a writer with a 'Golden Pen' (Gege Wura) could come up a brilliant write up like yours.
    Thanks for keeping our history alive and educating some of us that never knew about it.
    Long Live Olanrewaju Onigegewura.

    ReplyDelete
  107. Hmmm,it's very easy to read good piece like this. Sounds incredible and i doff my cap for Onigegewura. I love the piece but caution please. If you had ever been involved in politically motivated cases, you will be afraid of everybody especially when the State wants you down. It's not what you will wish for your enemies. They can plant anything and use anybody. I sympathize with the family of the man in question because they weren't given fair deal in this write up. Next time sir, kindly make a balanced story by airing from the people directly affected by your stories, or corroborate some of these stories. This is where the Western world is different, they do not joke with research and always ensure fair stories. If any of the actors is alive, I would indulge the Oredeins to kindly get a rejoinder because their words might not carry enough weight in public court of this magnitude. Some of those people who came to apologize and had their hands tight should come out and testify about what really transpired. This is what Onigegeara should have done because this bothers down to integrity and generational stain.Africans love sensational stories especially when their heroes crash. It could be true and could be false, whatever it was, may we know the truth one day. We crucify our heroes and love to scandalize them. My candid opinion please but a great and fantastic write up.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think your response has been the most appropriate, given the succinct write-up and the rejoinders from the family of Baba S T Oredein. It is important, if only for posterity, for commentaries to be obtained from those that will be directly impacted by a re-telling of such historical and legal happenstances. That is what makes a brilliant write-up a legacy. But well-done Onigegeara....Fascinating and enlightening research into a time past.

      Delete
  108. You actually refreshed my memory. I salute your recollection and power of presentations. We are expecting more. Onigegewura you are wonderful

    ReplyDelete
  109. Well good work. The initial story I heard then was that ST was executed with others. Please balance the story with side of the children using the comments ofYetunde ALAGBE as the compass to the truth. I knew Justices ADEDOYIN and Ekumdayo of blessed memory as men with God fearing hearts.

    ReplyDelete
  110. Please it is Justice Adesiyun and not adedoyin

    ReplyDelete
  111. Please it is Justice Adesiyun and and ADEDOYIN.

    ReplyDelete
  112. This is really an eye opener...its a very creative and an analytical write up.I don't think such justice can ever prevail in Nigeria again, gone are those days of integrity and honesty.

    ReplyDelete
  113. The STO story am very familiar with, as I was well advanced in High School Education when it broke and the ensuing revelations thereafter, but for the records too, the popular musician, Theophilus IWALOKUN the minstrel did an album on it, where he espoused all the ills associated with such deeds by highly placed people in the society and the lessons learnt from the landmark judgement.
    Am also aware, that for a long time, STO was in Ibara prisons, opposite the Governor's lodge, Abeokuta
    It would be good to also know how and when he died in prison and who came forward to claim his body for burial.
    How his twin brother SKO took it all and the effect on him and his o n children would be a fantastic read too.
    So, ONIGEGE! OVER TO YOU

    ReplyDelete
  114. This is a classical example of the Rule of Law. The diligent prosecution and thorough investigation before charging the accused in court, the Independence of the judiciary etc. All these values are somewhat missing nowadays. Today, almost in all cases rush to the court without appraising the evidence. The judges may even sell his conscience. Justice is denied when influencial persons commit crimes and are slapped at the wrists but ordinary people do same are punished severely. The law is no respecter.

    ReplyDelete
  115. My dad once told me about this piece when i was very young. Bad elements in poloitics has been with us for donkey years.

    ReplyDelete
  116. Thanks. I have the following questions.

    Did ST Oredein die in prison or he committed sucide? Did Awolowo his boss in former AG who just resigned from Gowon in administration in 1971 make any comment?

    ReplyDelete
  117. Thank U for bringing life to our recent history. Your style of writing add so much colour and verve, makes the story so unputdownable! More power to your elbow.

    ReplyDelete
  118. Very interesting story, his insatiable appetite for earthly things landed him in hell.
    Let me probe further, what were the roles of his political assoCiates in 'settling' the issue, did he eventually spend the rest of his life in jail as pronounced, was there any political influence from the party at the centre.
    Anyway, this is a great lesson for all, more ink to your pen.

    ReplyDelete
  119. Thank U for bringing life to our recent history. Your style of writing add so much colour and verve, makes the story so unputdownable! More power to your elbow.Adeola Amusat

    ReplyDelete
  120. What a shameful history....one day we shall read more of the current polithiefians....emabaye je ojowo etun se....

    ReplyDelete
  121. The argument that it was a setup cannot match here since it was during military era. I think more revelations would still come to do justice to the history written.

    ReplyDelete
  122. The argument that it was a setup cannot match here since it was during military era. I think more revelations would still come to do justice to the history written.

    ReplyDelete
  123. In as much as I enjoy this brilliant write up, may I also request Mrs Kemi oredehin to tell us more of the second side of the story.Thanks

    Twitter: @olawoyin4u

    ReplyDelete
  124. In as much as I enjoy this brilliant write up, may I also request Mrs Kemi oredehin to tell us more of the second side of the story.Thanks

    Twitter: @olawoyin4u

    ReplyDelete
  125. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  126. Wow, this is indeed a beautiful historical and educational piece, captivating enough to make one read every word in it.

    ReplyDelete
  127. Wow, this is indeed a beautiful historical and educational piece, captivating enough to make one read every word in it.

    ReplyDelete
  128. Latter in life now, Diezani Alison-Madueke,Omokore and Aluko's children or grandchildren will claim their mother or father was framed due to politics. If the Oredeins are sure their Father is innocent of the crime, they can reopen the case again or write a book about life and death of their father. Come to think of it o, which way Nigeria? How can someone that was sentenced life imprisonment spent just 10years in prison, how and why was he release. I don't think Oredein should have waited for this story from Onigegewura before coming out to clear their fathers name. ST Oredein came out from prison and became mute too, why would people that implicated him beg him in private and he wants to keep a legacy. To me now there is no way I will remember Oredein without saying, won ni baba yin ti jale ri (bitter truth), sorry if it hurts. Akoba adaba ko ni je ti wa.

    ReplyDelete
  129. If this happened in Nigeria, how did we get here.

    ReplyDelete
  130. Please why didn't you mention the name of Chief Bode Thomas one of the chietain of Action Congress. Infact, he's the chief financier of that party and he registered it.

    ReplyDelete
  131. This story is not true. Chief ST oredein was set up

    ReplyDelete
  132. I knew the man very well. He will never engage himself with robbery. He was a man of honour. He was my God Father of blessed memories...

    ReplyDelete
  133. I'd like to ask onigegewura , how old were you when this incident happened. U are not well informed about the truth of this story u published. Go do a proper research and stop misinforming the public. The truth of this matter is that the poor man was set up. Ok tell me why was he released with amnesty if he was a robber. Have u ever heard of any robber released on amnesty before. Truth be told, the robber denied ever knowing ST Oredein in the history of his life. The robbers were not even brought to court for the trial before they were executed. Mr onigegewura I gather u are a lawyer, u should do proper investigations and research before you publish historical stories like this. Please stop misinforming the public.

    ReplyDelete
  134. Mr sobayo. But you must know that amnesty does not mean that an offence had not been committed.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mr oyabayo I have the facts of the matter, my father was his solicitor. I also have the intention of the police and the state which was to bring ST oredein down .

      Delete
  135. MorounRanti Ashabi12 August 2017 at 15:43

    Fantastic piece of history Onigegewura.Thank you so much for sharing ��

    ReplyDelete
  136. It wont be out of place to open another phase of exploration on this matter. Which ever conclusion will educate and add more to public values.
    I am a film maker... I enjoy
    Onigegewura, thumbs up

    ReplyDelete
  137. This is an interesting story. Investigation was properly done and justice was properly served. The contemporary Nigeria may not the opportunity of such because money bags are making things difficult. A movie should be made out of this story. A lot has been done and said about Anenih and Oyenusi. Thank you for the story.

    ReplyDelete
  138. The Black man passes his story, formulae and recipe to the younger generation by word of mouth. The Oyinbo man documents his. Which one is more likely to withstand the sands of time?

    ST's children owe it to him to bring forth their own version. Did opportunists take advantage of the fact that political thugs associated with ST during political forays participated in the robbery? Being associated with ST might have granted them knowledge of the timing of the cash movement. Innocent people doing their work died during the robbery. They left wives, children, loved ones behind. Their blood deserves justice.

    Fela was imprisoned for a crime he never committed. When he went public with the fact that the judge reached out to him in prison, he regained his freedom.

    ema je ki a ma pe aja l'obo fun ra wa. We should quit fooling ourselves by calling a dog a monkey

    ReplyDelete
  139. Extremely interesting history...just curious what happened to him afterwards

    ReplyDelete
  140. Why haven't I been here all these while?! I was glued from the very first line until the very last line; what an interesting historical piece. Well-done!

    ReplyDelete
  141. Kudos to the writer it was a good fights and stand for justice then but some of those who rised to the highest point of their careers were no more just has the ware then.history find them wanting and full of compromises in discharing their duties which led us to our present situation in this country ,hopefully this writer has reminded us doing the right thing is our duty for we lived our love ones behind to bear the shame of their actions.

    ReplyDelete
  142. Hope the judges of today will know that politicians and political office holder are not and can't be above the law for a nation to move forward. God help Nigeria. Such write up should be publicly make available for the present day political office holder, Nigeria police and the judges on all the social media.

    ReplyDelete
  143. Brilliant history told brilliantly!

    ReplyDelete
  144. History is the record of past events, onigegewura have just screenplay the past event, is like I am watching video,thanks onigegewura.

    ReplyDelete
  145. Wow,Wow,wow... what a piece. Please can I have your number and email. Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  146. What an exposition!!! Thanks for this wonderful piece. Highly reflective of a great country with great values for reward and punishment. How I truly wish our dear country get her groove back in rewarding/elevating the good, brilliant, efficient and at the same time punishing the bad... Thanks once again for educating us about our pasts that are giving us hope that Nigeria can be great again.

    ReplyDelete
  147. I have followed the commentary on this master piece by Onigegewura very closely and I am very impressed by the origin piece and the comments it generated. For me the Oredein children starting with Mdm Kemi and all the other siblings, are a patent's answered prayer. You guys and gals, have done well. Omo rere a gbein yin (excuse my Yoruba, for I am Yuruba - Fulani). You fight an elegant and gallant fight to preserve the memory of your late father and good name of your family. Well done! Who amongst us would not pray for children like you? You fight a good fight and your father would smiling in his heaven.

    Thanks to Onigegewura, the bearer of golden pen, for creating the platform to have this discussion and for eloquently presenting historical data as they exist and thereby creating an avenue for further elucidation. This is brilliant. You all did an excellent job. May we all instill in our children the discipline and sense of your parents instilled in you. Through your collective efforts, I personally have acquired a different and deeper understanding of the politics of that era and the man, Oredein.

    Bravo!

    ReplyDelete
  148. Onigegewura, is a gem. I have been so impressed and educated since I came across your writings a short while ago. I look forward to more educative write-ups.Incidentally, I have read your pieces through forwarded whatsapp messages and on reading the first one, I was thinking the piece was written by an otherwise much-respected journalist who then demeaned his reputation by serving as a spokesman for Jonathan and then going againts all the sensible stuff he used to write...I am both delighted and relieved to find you are not him!!!

    ReplyDelete
  149. How i wish what happened way back then can still happen right now where justice will always prevail,and no one will be above the law politicians,police officers, the judge and the jury will not compromise justice and impunity will not be the order of the day

    ReplyDelete
  150. It appears people are mixing facts with emotions. I do feel for the family on this matter and emotions will definitely run in them. However may I suggest some humility approach because the writer has drawn his facts from historical facts. He was balanced in his report by highlighting positives works of STO. Attempts by the family to re write the story may even expose more facts to his today generation. This may either be,positive or negative. Allow the sleeping dog to lie, so say our elders.

    ReplyDelete
  151. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  152. To all of you applauding onigegewura on this blog, you have all been misinformed by onigegewura . S T Oredein was a victim of set up. He was never a robber. He was a man of honour and dignity. I can stand for that anywhere anytime.

    ReplyDelete
  153. S. A Adebayo-Onisile JP13 August 2017 at 10:38

    This is a moving piece. However, can we also read this compelling alternative narrative Oredein

    MY FATHER’S ACCUSERS APOLOGISED TO HIM - KEMI OREDEIN

    I've read it thoroughly and All I can say this. "One day, Taiwo's story would be rewritten. A man was jailed for life, yet his business flourished and while in prison, he educated 36 children and even died a rich man leaving vast Estate. How many Nigerian politicians encountered such problems and still died rich?

    Well, there's much people don't understand and would never understand. There was never a time my father begged for leniency. He told that court back then that if he had a hand in the robbery, he would die in prison and if not, he would return and HE DID RETURN.

    He went into politics a wealthy man and of course he was a very intelligent and brilliant man nobody could beat. A political strategist that is yet to be equalled in Nigeria.

    In his words "I thought it was a big joke. While in detention, the opposition party promised me freedom if I denounced Awolowo and I told them over my dead body. I had a bargain with them which of course they suspected I would not keep to cos they knew I was principled. I was shocked when I was jailed but I knew it was not over".

    A cabal wanted him out of the way at all cost. That's a story for another day.
    Once I watched a TV programme where one Olaifa a veteran journalist was interviewed and he was asked if he ever encountered any ordeal in the course of discharging his duty and his answer was "During Oredein's Robbery case, I was a young journalist and I was very keen on getting to the root of the case. I was privileged to know that the prosecuting attorney was visiting Oredein and I wondered why. Of course when I was found out, the authority was after me and I had to go into hiding for a while. Of course we, all knew what happened to Oredein".

    I do not have anything against the writer, he only rewrote the history he has access to but the people who jailed my father knew he was innocent

    ReplyDelete
  154. Having read Onigegewura's story and comments, i am of the opinion that politics is not only a dirty game but also a very dangerous activity any professional or man of means worth of his onions should not participate. If i may ask, what will somebody in the capacity of STO at that material time have to do with robbery? What i know is that politicians will not hesitate to do anything to keep out their ways whoever that stands in obstruction of their objectives. For those who are of the opinion that STO was culpable and guilty, can they also affirm that Chief Obafemi Awolowo and others including STO,Jakande, Michael Omisade and others were guilty of the reasonable charge? There is the fact that politicians doors are always open for thugs and people of questionable characters but in most cases they just have to mingle with everybody as they claim to work for the masses. In other words it might be a well orchestrated plan to keep STO out of circulation knowing fully well that he was a strong supporter of Chief Awolowo as the incident happened not long after Chief Awolowo resigned from Gowon's cabinet. Also,the activities of Sunday Adewusi concerning the 1979 and 83 elections spoke volume. We must be very careful in our judgements. Anybody can be a victim of frame up.

    ReplyDelete
  155. The lessons embedded in history cannot be overemphasized.Little foolishness exposes the intents of a crook

    ReplyDelete
  156. Did Fela lied against Justice Okoro Idogu when he said'he don't come beg me and the Judge was subsequently sacked?, did Awolowo and all those who went to prison with him lied?. Did Obasanjo, Yaradua, Vast a lied?. I have nothing for or against the Oredeins but I think Onigege wura as a lawyer would remember the British case of R vs. Evans which brought an end to capital punishment in Britain for inadvertently killing an innocent man for murder,the British establishment apologized and the DPP apologized and was almost stripped of his Queen's Counsel ship for misleading the society. This generation for once should research truthfully into the past and tell us the truth or else we will not be in any way different from 'THEM'.Even Justice Ekundayo was victimized out of the judiciary when he headed a panel and advised in its white paper that the Afonjas were entitled to be Obas of Ilorin.

    ReplyDelete
  157. Very interesting story. Kudos to Onigegewura for a great job. Waiting to read more eg 'The Akintola and Awolowo story' Please. Thanking you in advance my brother

    ReplyDelete